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Encrypted: encryption technologies on this website

This is an overview on all information about encryption technologies on this website. The original descriptions of the encryption algorithms do not underly the UGPL license and the copyright statement of this homepage and are presented here only for download purposes, see futher information on respective homepages.
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  • Encryption algorithm Blowfish
  • Encryption algorithm Twofish
  • Encryption algorithm Rijndael/AES (Advanced Encryption Standard)
    • On Sep. 02, 2000 Rijndael was officially selected as Advanced Encryption Standard algorithm by NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). Here a part of NIST's AES report with a short history of the selection:

On January 2, 1997, NIST announced the initiation of an effort to develop the AES [31]
and made a formal call for algorithms on September 12, 1997 [32]. The call indicated
NIST’s goal that the AES would specify an unclassified, publicly disclosed encryption
algorithm, available royalty-free, worldwide. At a minimum, the algorithm would have
to implement symmetric key cryptography as a block cipher and support a block size of
128 bits and key sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits.
On August 20, 1998, NIST announced fifteen AES candidate algorithms at the First AES
Candidate Conference (AES1) and solicited public comments on the candidates [33].
Industry and academia submitters from twelve countries proposed the fifteen algorithms.
A Second AES Candidate Conference (AES2) was held in March 1999 to discuss the
results of the analysis that was conducted by the international cryptographic community
on the candidate algorithms. In August 1999, NIST announced its selection of five
finalist algorithms from the fifteen candidates. The selected algorithms were MARS,
RC6TM, Rijndael, Serpent and Twofish.
  
  • Rijndael description (AES Homepage)

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